Color Therapy (Chromotherapy)

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My favorite color is YELLOW. It’s bright, it’s cheerful, and it helps with my mood, especially when dealing with writer’s depression. Two years ago I even went as far as decorating my apartment livingroom in bright yellow decor with gray accents.

I recently found out about color therapy, also known as

Chromotherapy

and realized that this may be the reason to my attachment to the color yellow. So of course, I wanted to do a little more research on the subject.

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Some of what I found was that color therapy is a not a new type of healing. The practice began in ancient Eygpt and is still practiced in that part of the world for healing.

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In the western parts, I noticed that it’s not used much nowadays for healing except by natural healers, in saunas, by spa companies, and by some skin care retailers.

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What Exactly Is Color Therapy?


Check out the video below about color therapy and how even some skin care retailers are using it to sell products.


COLOR THERAPY IN GUIDED MEDITATION

My favorite content creators on YouTube for guided meditations are The Honest Guys. Feel free to check out this guided meditation video when you have time, as well as other regular guided meditations by The Honest Guys.


Other ways to incorporate color therapy


References:
https://www.regain.us/advice/therapist/what-is-color-therapy-what-is-it-for-and-is-it-right-for-me/

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Health Benefits of HUGS

man and woman holding free hugs signage

Photo by Alexander Daoud on Pexels.com

Recently my daughter had a stressful week. During that time, I noticed that she asked me for more hugs, as well as hugged her cat and stuffed animals more. Hugging seemed to have a healthy effect on her. Which led me to researching about this everyday physical contact that we take for granted.

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The benefits aren’t limited to just children & babies

I remember reading that hugging is great for self-care and help boost high vibratons. Well, it turns out that there are more health benefits to hugging than people even know.

Check out the video below to learn more about the benefits of hugs for adults and children.

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20-Second Rule

Keep in mind that it takes atleast 20 seconds to reap the healing benefits, according to studies.

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BEWARE

Hugging should only be acted upon with consent. Mainly with people you know. Some people have phobias about touching or aren’t as comfortable with the idea.


In Conclusion:

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Normal Grief vs Masked/ Delayed/& Prolonged Grief

When I was eleven my father died. I didn’t cry when my aunt broke the news to me, nor did I cry during the funeral. It wasn’t until I was in my mid 30s that I finally broke down and cried over my father’s death. However it wasn’t without consequences. One could even point out that my clinical depression (atypical) & trichotillomania, more than likely stemmed from what is referred to as Masked Grief.

Then there’s Delayed Grief.

Unlike delayed or masked grief, sufferers of Prolonged Grief Disorder “deal” with the loss head on, but not in the most healthy way. A great example of this may be the main character of the television series, Monk.

In this series, Adrian Monk, has a hard time letting go of his deceased wife, Trudy. Even after over 9 years, he refuses to take off his wedding ring, he keeps his late wife’s office intact (while still paying rent for it), he refuses to date, his coffee table is kept the same angle his wife would have it when she rested her feet on it, and much more. His loss of his wife has even magnified his OCD to the point where he has to see a shrink. There are even scenes where he hallucinates and have full conversations with Trudy.

Although the symptoms may not be as exact as those I’ve just stated, below are signs of one who may be suffering from prolonged grief disorder:

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Normal grief is defined as having 5 stages:

1. Denial & Isolation

2. Anger

3. Bargaining (“if only..”)

4. Depression

5. Acceptance

It is not always necessarily in the same order for everyone nor do everyone go tthrough all five.

As if grief alone isn’t difficult enough to deal with, grieving isnt as always cut & dry. In fact, there are various other types of grief that many people may not even be aware that they or someone they know may be dealing with.



Coping with Grief

Below are a few resources for coping with a loss:

How to deal with Grief when someone you love dies (Video)

1-800-273-8255

It is always recommended to speak with a professional or at least someone you can confide if you’re having thoughts of suicide or feelings of hopelessness .

Bereavement Groups and Online Resources



(Update: 10/28/19)

Rest in Power grandma